See more objects with the tag 3D printing, brace, nylon.

Object Timeline

2016

  • Work on this object began.

2017

2021

  • You found it!

Object ID #1108799579

This is a scoliosis brace prototype. It was designed by Francis Bitonti, Peter Wildfeuer and Li Chen and manufactured by UNYQ. It is dated 2016 and we acquired it in 2017. Its medium is nylon. It is a part of the Product Design and Decorative Arts department.

Scoliosis, a curvature of the spine, most typically affects teenagers, with girls more likely to develop a curvature that requires treatment. Wearing a brace up to 18 hours a day is the most common therapy. The traditional brace, constricting and bulky, is often considered unattractive as well. Digital design techniques and 3D printing are used to create this customized light and appealingly stylish latticework form. It requires up to 75% less material than the traditional device to achieve the requisite support with greater freedom of movement. The UNYQ Align also uses an embedded digital component to monitor progress via an app.

It is credited Museum purchase from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund.

Our curators have highlighted 1 object that are related to this one.

Its dimensions are

H x W x D: 43.5 × 28 × 27.5 cm (17 1/8 in. × 11 in. × 10 13/16 in.)

Cite this object as

Object ID #1108799579; Designed by Francis Bitonti, Peter Wildfeuer and Li Chen; nylon; H x W x D: 43.5 × 28 × 27.5 cm (17 1/8 in. × 11 in. × 10 13/16 in.); Museum purchase from General Acquisitions Endowment Fund; 2017-12-1

This object was previously on display as a part of the exhibition Making | Breaking: New Arrivals.

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-4.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108799579/ |title=Object ID #1108799579 |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=6 December 2021 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>