Object Timeline

1953

  • Work on this object began.

2016

  • We acquired this object.

2017

2022

  • You found it!

Textile, Iliad

This is a Textile. It was designed by Vincent Malta and produced by Associated American Artists. It is dated 1953 and we acquired it in 2016. Its medium is cotton and its technique is printed. It is a part of the Textiles department.

Expressionist painter Vincent Malta counts Vermeer and Rubens among his influences, and the immediacy of the Baroque is clear in his action-packed Iliad design. Scenes from the epic story of Troy unfold in line drawings of chariots, horses, warriors, and rulers in turquoise, lime green, and two shades of orange on a black ground.

In the 1950s, designer Sue Mason Jr. for Saba of California fashioned Iliad into a dress and matching shawl. (1)

(1) Karen J. Herbaugh, “Index of AAA Textile Designs,” in Art for Every Home: An Illustrated Index of Associated American Artists Prints, Ceramics, and Textile Designs (Manhattan: Marianna Kistler Beach Museum, Kansas State University, 2016), http://hdl.handle.net/2097/19686.

This object was donated by American Textile History Museum. It is credited American Textile History Museum Collection, museum purchase through gift of anonymous donor.

Its dimensions are

H x W: 188.6 × 88.9 cm (6 ft. 2 1/4 in. × 35 in.)

Cite this object as

Textile, Iliad; Designed by Vincent Malta (American, b. 1922); cotton; H x W: 188.6 × 88.9 cm (6 ft. 2 1/4 in. × 35 in.); American Textile History Museum Collection, museum purchase through gift of anonymous donor; 2016-35-19

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<ref name=CH>{{cite web |url=https://www-4.collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/1108711549/ |title=Textile, Iliad |author=Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum |accessdate=25 September 2022 |publisher=Smithsonian Institution}}</ref>